ancient egypt: history and culture
Ancient Egyptian deities: The crocodile god Sobek
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Sobek

    also Sebek, Greek Suchos, Sukhos
 
Suchos     Sobek, sbk (transliteration sbk), was a Crocodile god venerated at Crocodilopolis in the Faiyum which was an important oracular centre during the Graeco-Roman Period, and, together with Haroeris (Horus the Elder), in the twin-temple at Kom Ombo where a crocodile necropolis was discovered. He was at times identified with Khenti-kheti of Athribis. Seti I referred to him as Lord of Silsileh where he had a temple during the 19th dynasty. As god of the water he created the Nile from his sweat and caused plants to be lush and green, one of the traditional roles of Osiris.
    Ramses III recorded the following donation:
People whom he gave to the house of Sebek of Shedet, Horus, dwelling in the Fayum: heads 146
Papyrus Harris
J. H. Breasted, Ancient Records of Egypt, Part Four, § 369 <

Relationships with other gods

    During the Old Kingdom he was considered a son of Neith.

Triads

    He formed one triad with his consort Tasenetnofret and Panebtawi, the child Lord of the Two Lands, another with Hathor and Khonsu.

Syncretisms

    He was thus at times identified with Horus depicted as a crocodile with Falcon head and double crown. At Aswan he was, merged with Re and called Sobek-Re, Lord of Sunu (Aswan) and carried the sun disk on his head.
O majesty of the twin lands, you whom Ra loves, whom Montu Lord of Thebes praises, as do Amon who establishes the throne of Egypt, Sobek-Ra, Horus, Hathor, Atum and the nine gods.
Sa Nehet (The Tale of Sinuhe)
J. Rabinowitz ,Isle of Fire, p.68
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